Board   E4EC
 
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Many people like to play chess, but not all of them like correspondence chess. If you want to find out if this club is right for you, please read the statements below and check if they apply to you or not.
  • I like to play correspondence chess, or email chess.
  • I know the rules of chess or at least I'm ready to learn them.
  • I enjoy slower games, I like to analyze my games.
  • I will not use computer or other help, I play using my own brain.
  • I can play more games simultaneously if I have enough thinking time.
  • I want to deal with my games when I have time for them.
  • I don't mind if games last for several weeks or even a month or so, if I have enough time to think about my moves.
  • I would probably enjoy playing people from far away countries.
  • I can learn simple commands to take my moves, offer draw, challenge somebody, etc.
If most of these statements are true for you (the first four should be!), then this is the place you are searching for and you'll play exciting games here in the near future.

Why not join the club today? Just visit our Registration page and you'll be enjoying chess with new friends very soon.


 
Chess Tournaments

Modern chess tournaments began in the 1840s and the first international tournament was held in London, in 1851. Strong international tournaments were still quite rare and in the 1880s a master would have been lucky to be able to play in one reasonably strong tournament a year.

By the 1890s, however, a master could enter many strong tournaments throughout the year, and the prize money offered at tournaments made it possible for masters to have a professional chess career.

Nowadays there are many strong tournaments for masters and grandmasters, but there are also a huge number of tournaments for players of every strength. Weaker players today have the chance of improving their play by taking part in such tournaments, which are very competitive.
 
FEN Support

FEN is the abbreviation of the Forsyth-Edwards Notation, and it's fully supported in the club.
A FEN text contains one single textual line, which describes a setup of a game, and some other things about it.

In all the details please see here.

We can use FEN lines to start a game from a defined setup.
And for sending in our favorite chess problems also.
 
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