Board   E4EC
 
Here you can find some things about the history of the club
 
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E4EC History


The idea of creating an email chess server began early in 2001. A few lines of codes were written to see if it is possible to make email chess easier. Could we establish a club where people can play chess simply by email? I know what huge efforts are needed to maintain an email chess club, but what are the computers for if not to take the hard and regular work from humans?

The club was founded in the middle of 2001, when a few obsessed and curious players were trying to use the system's first facilities. It had no name, and a lot of very useful things were still unsupported. But at least we could make moves. :-)

At the beginning of 2002 the club was deemed ready for the Internet public, most of the basic facilities needed to start and play games were working.

By the end of 2002 much work had been done and the following facilities were supported: the pairing system, PGN and FEN support, time controls, vacation policy, the reminder system, and a lot of other stuff were ready, such as starting games with standard openings, assigning colour during a challenge, friendly games, and the chess problem system, to mention only the major things.

On November 20, 2002 the club got it's final name, E4EC, which stands for E4 Emailchess Club, and e4ec.org became the club's Internet domain.

A few things remain to be completed in 2004. The biggest challenge is to support more types of tournaments.


A few milestones:

Jan 07, 2003 The daily number of moves first raised over 100.
Jan 10, 2003 The number of players reached 50.
May 09, 2003 The Hungarian Chess Federation put a link to the club onto its homepage.
Jul 22, 2003 The daily number of moves first raised over 250.
Sep 19, 2003 The number of players reached 100, while inactive players are removed.
Nov 10, 2003 Someone from the Hungarian Chess Federation called me to organize the I. Hungarian E-mail Final in the club. Of course, the request was accepted.
Feb 02, 2004 The number of moves a day first raised over 500.
Aug 27, 2004 The number of moves a day first raised over 1,000.
May 01, 2005 The 10,000th game started.



 
Chess Tournaments

Modern chess tournaments began in the 1840s and the first international tournament was held in London, in 1851. Strong international tournaments were still quite rare and in the 1880s a master would have been lucky to be able to play in one reasonably strong tournament a year.

By the 1890s, however, a master could enter many strong tournaments throughout the year, and the prize money offered at tournaments made it possible for masters to have a professional chess career.

Nowadays there are many strong tournaments for masters and grandmasters, but there are also a huge number of tournaments for players of every strength. Weaker players today have the chance of improving their play by taking part in such tournaments, which are very competitive.
 
Time Controls

Players can use more different time controls in the club.
10/30 - This is the default time control. Club level tournaments and games by pairing use this one. Here 10 moves must be taken in 30 days. Clocks start with 30 days, the thinking time is always subtracted from them, but another 30 days are added at every 10th move. The maximum the clocks can show is 40 days.
10/40 - This is a bit slower time control. 10 moves must be taken in 40 days, the addition is 40 days, and the maximum is 50 days.
10/50 - More slower, 50 days for 10 moves, 50 days addition at every 10th move, the maximum is 65 days.
5+1 - This is a faster one. Here the clocks start with 5 days on them. The used up thinking time is subtracted also, and 1 day is added at each move. The maximum is 30 days here too.
The server manages the clocks, it calculates the thinking times, adds, subtracts, and does everything. Records everything in the game logs.
If a clock runs out of time, the player will be considered as being on an unannounced vacation. If it elapses also, he'll loose the game, the opponent can claim result.
 
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