Board   E4EC
 
Here you can find some things about the history of the club
 
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E4EC History


The idea of creating an email chess server began early in 2001. A few lines of codes were written to see if it is possible to make email chess easier. Could we establish a club where people can play chess simply by email? I know what huge efforts are needed to maintain an email chess club, but what are the computers for if not to take the hard and regular work from humans?

The club was founded in the middle of 2001, when a few obsessed and curious players were trying to use the system's first facilities. It had no name, and a lot of very useful things were still unsupported. But at least we could make moves. :-)

At the beginning of 2002 the club was deemed ready for the Internet public, most of the basic facilities needed to start and play games were working.

By the end of 2002 much work had been done and the following facilities were supported: the pairing system, PGN and FEN support, time controls, vacation policy, the reminder system, and a lot of other stuff were ready, such as starting games with standard openings, assigning colour during a challenge, friendly games, and the chess problem system, to mention only the major things.

On November 20, 2002 the club got it's final name, E4EC, which stands for E4 Emailchess Club, and e4ec.org became the club's Internet domain.

A few things remain to be completed in 2004. The biggest challenge is to support more types of tournaments.


A few milestones:

Jan 07, 2003 The daily number of moves first raised over 100.
Jan 10, 2003 The number of players reached 50.
May 09, 2003 The Hungarian Chess Federation put a link to the club onto its homepage.
Jul 22, 2003 The daily number of moves first raised over 250.
Sep 19, 2003 The number of players reached 100, while inactive players are removed.
Nov 10, 2003 Someone from the Hungarian Chess Federation called me to organize the I. Hungarian E-mail Final in the club. Of course, the request was accepted.
Feb 02, 2004 The number of moves a day first raised over 500.
Aug 27, 2004 The number of moves a day first raised over 1,000.
May 01, 2005 The 10,000th game started.



 
ELO Rating

Muscler An ELO rating is the result of statistical calculations designed to measure the playing strength of players. These methods were developed by Arpad Elo and are named after him. The ELO system is in almost universal use and has been further refined by others, notably Glicko, but is still named after its creator.

In devising the ELO scale, some premises were used that are worthy of note. It was decided that a rating of 2000 would be the equivalent to scoring 50% in a US Open Championship. It was also decided that a player's rating would never be negative.

Importantly, the standard deviation was fixed at 200 points. This means that if a player's true strength is 1500, he will score around 68% of his results within the range of 1400 to 1600 (as measured by performance formulae). Another result of fixing the standard deviation at 200 points is that it also defines playing categories. For example, most International Masters and Grandmasters are in the 2400 - 2600 category, most national masters in the 2200 - 2400 category. Those in the 2000 - 2200 category are called Experts, or Candidate Masters.
 
Strict mode

Saying the truth, mis-writing a move in correspondence chess can be fatal for the game.
But it depends, if the miswritten move is still valid or not fully valid. For example if the check mark (+) is missing, our opponent can reject the move, and can send it back to us for correction.
But if we have two knights, one can move to e4 and the other one can move to e5, mis-writing 12.Ne4 to 12.Ne5 can be fatal, and there is no way to proof we wanted to move the other knight.
This is a problem, that can be solved in server based correspondence chess, that this club offers.
By default the server is very indulgent in accepting moves, it accepts invalid moves if they are still unambiguous, adds check and capture marks, doesn't require the move number, etc. This is for reducing the number of rejected moves, but it results that some miswritten moves are not rejected, and are accepted as a different move.
Those players who manually compose their move messages, and therefore sometimes miswrite their moves may find the StrictMode setting useful.
If they turn it on, the server will accept only fully valid, complete moves exactly as shown in the next example:
Move 1234 12.Nd2-e4
In strict mode the server requires the move number, one dot as white and three dots as black, the piece letter (even at pawns), the from square, the capture mark or hyphen, the target square, and the check mark if needed. If any of these parts is missing, or the whole move is invalid the server rejects the move.
This way the chance that a miswritten move can be valid as an other move is lowered quite dramatically.
 
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