Board   E4EC
 
Tournaments of the club
  Tournaments


Players can enter tournaments organized by the club. To protect serious players, new members cannot enter tournaments immediately after their registration. 5 rated games need to be finished to be considered as a serious player and to be able to enter tournaments. Normally finished games are those that end in checkmate, stalemate, a draw agreement, a valid draw claim, or resignation. Friendly, deleted and time forfeited games don't count into this value.

When a player enters for a tournament, those of their games which belong to already entered players are started. Their other games in that tournament are waiting until the corresponding player enters.

When a tournament fills up, another tournament is started automatically with the same parameters. This ensures that in each rating class, in each (future) types there is always a tournament which is open for entrants.

Players can enter for more tournaments until they have enough free game slots. This is 16 initially and raises by 2 with each normally finished games until 100.

Players can play other games simultaneously that are started by challenges or pairing, until the above criteria are met.

Each won game is worth 1 point, a draw 0.5, a lost 0. The winner of a tournament is the player who collects the most points. In the case of a tie, the Sonneborg-Berger formula decides the winner. When the last game finishes in a tournament, the entrants get result announcement and the tournament closes.

All tournaments are time controlled. Now all of them run in 10/30, so 10 moves must be taken in 30 days. The ceiling is 40 days. This means all their games run in that time control. Later another tournaments may come with either faster (e.g. 5+1) or slower (e.g. 10/50) time controls. External organizations' tournaments can run under different time control.

The vacation policy applies to tournament games. Players can announce their planned vacations, or when they are in trouble, the automatic vacation protects their games from timeout.

Currently, the following types of tournaments run:
  • Class based 7 player single round-robin: These tournaments are class based, this ensures that players can play others around the same rating. These classes are shown in the table on the right. In this tournament 7 players play one game with each other entrants in alternating color. This means the maximum number of simultaneous games is 6 for one player.
  • Multiclass 9 player single round-robin: Players of three neighbor classes can enter for the same tournamets. This ensures, players can play others with higher rating difference.
  • Multiclass 6 player double round-robin, Fischer Random: Three neighbor classes belong to these tournaments, but here all players play two games with each opponent, once as black, once as right. The games run under the rules of the Fischer Random variant. A tournament like this means 10 simultaneous games for each entrants.
  • Invitation based 15 player single round-robin: This is almost the same as above, external organizations use this type with 15 entrants. Players according to their previous results are allowed to enter for these tournaments.
Ratings are recalculated after each finished game immediately by the chess server. This is the standard elo rating calculation implemented by the Glicko method. Except those games where the club's Regulations don't apply. These game are not rated by the club.

There is no prize in club level tournaments, but they give good play opportunity and appreciation for the winners.


 
Hutton Pairing

Hutton pairing is a system of matching many teams while demanding only one game from each player taking part. It was devised in 1921 by a Scottish clergyman, George Dickson Hutton (1866 - 1929), and has been used regularly for correspondence team events and for matches where many teams assemble on one day, for this reason it is sometimes called "jamboree pairing".

The players in each team are ranked in order of strength and each player meets someone of similar ranking. When the number of teams is one more than the number of boards, each team meets every other team on one board only. Organisers use pairing tables which enable them to cope with any number of teams and any number of boards.
 
FEN Support

FEN is the abbreviation of the Forsyth-Edwards Notation, and it's fully supported in the club.
A FEN text contains one single textual line, which describes a setup of a game, and some other things about it.

In all the details please see here.

We can use FEN lines to start a game from a defined setup.
And for sending in our favorite chess problems also.
 
shamskhan wrote this notice on Jun 14, 2008:

I m a very strong player n m seeking 2 play with the strongest opponents


Post Your Notice

Voice your opinion about this page to the other visitors.

Your name:


 Send notice 

 
Tools

For easier printing of this page there is a printer friendly version of it:

 Print view 

To suggest this page someone:

 Send to a friend 

To view this page with another font size:



 Update 

 


    This is a dynamic page, took 8 milliseconds to generate it.