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Some stories from the world of chess...
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Hutton Pairing

Hutton pairing is a system of matching many teams while demanding only one game from each player taking part. It was devised in 1921 by a Scottish clergyman, George Dickson Hutton (1866 - 1929), and has been used regularly for correspondence team events and for matches where many teams assemble on one day, for this reason it is sometimes called "jamboree pairing".

The players in each team are ranked in order of strength and each player meets someone of similar ranking. When the number of teams is one more than the number of boards, each team meets every other team on one board only. Organisers use pairing tables which enable them to cope with any number of teams and any number of boards.


The following list contains all the stories gathered from here and there.
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Tournaments

There are chess tournaments in the club continuously.
Now single round-robin, class based tournaments run only. They are class based that ensures players in similar ratings play each other. The games run simultaneously in round-robin tournaments, so a seven player event means 6 games in one time.
There are single class tournaments, where players of each 200 points class play each other. These events are always for 7 players.
And there are multi-class tournaments also, where players from 3 neighbor classes can play in. These are always for 9 players.

Whenever a tournament fills up, another one starts with the same parameters.

To protect serious players, new members can enter for tournaments after they have finished 5 games in order, and if their reliability factor is not below the value of 5.

In more details on the Tournaments page.
 
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